Monday, January 21, 2013

Ecuador's president asks Obama to stop double standards towards Latin America

Ecuador,president Rafael Correa
Rafael Correa
Ecuador news - Quito, Jan. 21 (Prensa Latina) The current President of Ecuador and PAIS Alliance candidate asked today that his U.S. counterpart, Barack Obama, end the double standards in his policies toward Latin America.

The Ecuadoran president wished Obama well in his second term, and for the greatest possible success in his government, but speaking as the former president of the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR) Correa also said the United States had scarcely changed its foreign policy toward the region.

"I got to know Obama personally at the Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago (2009)," he said, "and he seems like a good person, but he continues to apply a double standard toward Latin America, where leaders are considered to be good if they are friendly with the United States." 

Latin American and Caribbean leaders are seen as "bad" if they are seen as enemies, or if they fail to submit to the whims of U.S. presidents, Correa said in an interview with a number of different radio stations in the capital. 

"The most shameful presidents in Latin America have been put forward as examples of democracy, despite the accusations against them for their attacks on human rights and for their links with paramilitary and drug-trafficking groups," he added.

"And those of us who give our lives for human rights are often slammed, called bloodthirsty ambitious dictators, within this policy of double standards," said Correa.

"It has nothing to do with whether the government is actually good, whether it has a good person as president," he stressed, "as long as you are friendly, you are accepted, no matter how shameless or dictatorial." 

On the contrary, he added, "if you don't submit to everything that we (the U.S. government) tell you to do, as usual, you are the worst of the worst, and you will be lynched by the media on an international scale." 

The double standard has not changed, said Correa. "If 10 people in Luluncoto are arrested (for suspected acts of sabotage and terrorism) it is said that this is an attack on human rights, but they are the ones who arrested 700 people for taking over a bridge in Brooklyn." 

"And that's not all," said Correa. "In Guantanamo (Cuban territory occupied by the United States against all international laws and the opinion of the people) torture is ongoing and nothing changes. Targeted killings are being committed through drones (unmanned aircraft) and nothing changes." 

"Enough already!" he insisted, pointing out that "the U.S. issues reports on human rights everywhere else and continues with that kind of arrogance, that self-granted moral supremacy." 

"Who named them (the United States) the arbiters of good and evil? This has to change," Correa said.